Thoughts on Better Aging

How Healthy is Your Salad?

June 12th, 2017

Compare the nutrition in popular salad greens

Are you trying to lose weight or simply eat a healthier diet? Adding salads to your meal plan can be an excellent way to reach your goal. However, not all salads are created equal in terms of nutrition. So before you congratulate yourself on ordering a salad next time you’re eating out, stop and consider what kind of nutrition that bowl of greens is really giving you.

Iceberg: Iceberg lettuce has a delightfully crisp, juicy mouthfeel. But unfortunately, it’s not the most nutritious salad base. A two-cup serving of iceberg contains 1 gram of protein, 1 gram of fiber, 30 percent of your vitamin K, plus some folate and vitamin A.

Romaine: This salad staple has a mild taste and a nice crunch. While it contains about the same amount of protein and fiber as iceberg, romaine has a lot more vitamins. A two-cup serving will deliver 164 percent of your vitamin A, 120 percent of your vitamin K, 38 percent of your vitamin C, and 32 percent of your folate, plus other nutrients like manganese, iron, and potassium.

Butter Lettuce: While it doesn’t quite match the nutrients of romaine, butter lettuce is another solid alternative to iceberg lettuce. It contains 1 gram of protein, 1 gram of fiber, 100 percent of your vitamin K, 30 percent of your vitamin A, and 20 percent of your folate, plus smaller amounts of important minerals like potassium, copper, phosphorous, and magnesium.

Arugula: Arugula’s spicy flavor can make a welcome change from other greens, but since it isn’t too nutritious, you probably don’t want an all-arugula salad. Two cups of arugula contain 50 percent of your vitamin K, 10 percent of your folate, and 5 percent of your calcium. Arugula also contains some copper, magnesium, vitamin C, and vitamin A.

Kale: You may already know that kale is a superfood. It makes an excellent salad base, with 6 grams of protein, 3 grams of fiber, 150 percent of your vitamin C, 100 percent of your vitamin A, and 20 percent of your calcium, plus a fair amount of copper, phosphorous, and magnesium. Kale is also packed with about nine times the vitamin K you need in a day.

Spinach: If kale has too strong a taste for you, spinach is a respectable alternative. Two cups of spinach deliver 2 grams of protein, 1 gram of fiber, 300 percent of your vitamin K, 30 percent of your folate, 22 percent of your vitamin C, and 15 percent of your magnesium. Spinach is also a good source of copper, iron, potassium, calcium, and zinc.

If you would like to learn more about the nutrition your changing body needs as you age, please contact Renew Youth at 800-859-7511. We offer our own line of third-party-tested nutritional supplements specifically designed for the needs of older men and women.

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